Miscellaneous

Dancing Drums: Canto a la Bomba Mayagüeza

»Posted by | 0 comments

Dancing Drums: Canto a la Bomba Mayagüeza Tronad, tambores; vibrad, maracas. Por la encendida calle antillana –Rumba, macumba, candombe, bámbula– Majestad Negra Luis Palés Matos   Carimbo, don, donbombo… es el tambor que llama, es el tambor que tumba, es el tambor que baila.   El tambor que sigue y persigue, a la mujer que se mueve que da un toque y otro que le pregunta al tambor: “¿Mira ver si puedes o no?” Si puedes seguir mis pasos, si puedes seguir mis manos si puedes seguir esta falda de colores o estas guiñadas, dulces piquetes, dulces como almíbar y melao. “¿Mira ver si eres diestro?” Si tus dedos se pueden mover como el viento, como el viento y el trueno, y si tu corazón puede mover el mío que te mira de reojo, que ama tu movimiento,...

read more

Réquiem: Quatre Scènes et un Épilogue

»Posted by | 2 comments

Réquiem: Quatre Scènes et un Épilogue by Linda M. Rodríguez Guglielmoni Para Lisbeth, asesinada en una noche de febrero, el mes del amor, en las calles de San Juan. Si soy Autor y si la fiesta es mía, por fuerza la ha de hacer mi compañía. Y pues que yo escogí de los primeros los hombres, y ellos son mis compañeros, ellos, en el teatro del mundo… Pedro Calderón de la Barca                                      Scène Première: The Dream I dropped the queen’s crown. My five-year-old hands let it slip and slide from its satiny stand. Glass and metal on the ground, time to find another crown. My father saved the moment. With his handy hands he put the crown together again. I, in a long satiny red dress ‑what a burden for a child‑ trembled, step by step,...

read more

Dancing Drums: Song to the Mayagüez Bomba

»Posted by | 0 comments

Dancing Drums: Song to the Mayagüez Bomba Tronad, tambores; vibrad, maracas. Por la encendida calle antillana –Rumba, macumba, candombe, bámbula– Majestad Negra – Luis Palés Matos   Carimbo, don, donbombo… es el tambor que llama, es el tambor que tumba, es el tambor que baila.   El tambor que sigue y persigue, a la mujer que se mueve que da un toque y otro que le pregunta al tambor: “¿Mira ver si puedes o no?” Si puedes seguir mis pasos, si puedes seguir mis manos si puedes seguir esta falda de colores o estas guiñadas, dulces piquetes, dulces como almíbar y melao. “¿Mira ver si eres diestro?” Si tus dedos se pueden mover como el viento, como el viento y el trueno, y si tu corazón puede mover el mío que te mira de reojo, que ama tu...

read more

WE GATHERED * POR COSTUMBRE

»Posted by | 0 comments

WE                                                  POR GATHERED                                  COSTUMBRE by Linda Rodriguez Guglielmoni   “We also die,” says Ñaña, “we also hurt,” pinching the honey-brown skin on her forearm… The Other Side/El otro lado, Chapters V and VII,  Julia Alvarez to see                                                       skins café con leche, de azabache y nácar to kiss                                                      cheeks thin, pale como papel de arroz   faded                                                        made so tough by the Jersey –                                                 Manhattan commute   or tanned                                               turned thick by the endless hammering light...

read more

As a Child Near the Sunken Ship…

»Posted by | 0 comments

As a Child Near the Sunken Ship my Father Had Rescued from the Sea by Linda Rodriguez Guglielmoni   Once a blood-thirsty sea star wondered out loud to me, “¿Qué hace tu padre? “¿Consultando libros de carpintería? ¿Mapas marinos?” And sticking their heads out of the sand, a couple of red-eyed jueyes had echoed fiercely, “What is your father doing?” “Consulting books of carpentry? Charts of the sea?”   Then a group of barnacles, their barbed legs waving, had watched their babies swim away with hopes of attaching themselves to the smiling whale. And after they had dried their tears, the crustaceans had called me whispering into my young ears, “Tell him this ship will not be afloat again, now it belongs to us.”   And as I ran away to hide under the...

read more

The Coconut Man

»Posted by | 0 comments

The Coconut Man by Linda Rodriguez Guglielmoni Being the coconut man is not a job for me because he’s the man with the machete, he’s the one that eyes you up when you say, “Un coco, por favor.” And if he likes you he picks up a young one for you, nice and cold from the industrial-sized horizontal fridge, but if you don’t say, “please” or smile not quite right at him, he’ll pick out an old one for you, chilled perhaps, but no good.   Old coconuts look fine on the outside, but in the inside, hum, they are lots of trouble. Coconuts know all the moves, when to flower and when to fall, when to fill with water and when to dry out, when to stay home or simply ship out, when to line themselves with a tender jelly, and when to become hard, good only for cooking and...

read more